Based in New York and Beirut, L.E.FT Discusses Building in Politically Conflicted Contexts

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/5a/5a2e9zrusch8ck7h.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/5a/5a2e9zrusch8ck7h.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/5a/5a2e9zrusch8ck7h.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/5a/5a2e9zrusch8ck7h.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Established in New York in 2005 by Makram El Kadi and Ziad Jamaleddine, <a href="https://archinect.com/firms/cover/3588/l-e-ft" >L.E.FT</a> is dedicated to examining the intersections of cultural and political productions as they relate to the built environment. Now with a studio in Beirut as well, the practice has completed residential and cultural projects in&nbsp;New York, Dubai, Turkey, and Beirut.&nbsp;
For this week's Small Studio Snapshot, we talk with the firm about their pursuits, how they incorporate research interests into their built works, and what it's like to build in politically unstable regions such as the Middle East. 

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