Carmody Groarke build a giant cage sustaining a Scottish landmark

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/p3/p3fpw22r29bul6oj.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/p3/p3fpw22r29bul6oj.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/p3/p3fpw22r29bul6oj.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/p3/p3fpw22r29bul6oj.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em><p>The Hill House in Helensburgh was built as "a home for the future" by Charles Rennie Mackintosh in 1902. But the experimental building material used has allowed water to soak into the building. Now, the National Trust for Scotland will surround the house with a protective "shield" in the form of a "giant cage" while it comes up with ways to restore it. The trust plans to build the huge see-through structure [...] over the top of the landmark to protect the building from the elements.</p></em><br /><br /><p>This temporary structure buys <a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/146748/preservation" rel="nofollow" >preservationists</a> time in finding a permanent solution to the building's structural problem. While the design problem persists, architects Carmody and Groarke have allowed a unique opportunity for visitors to experience the <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/129910/landmark" rel="nofollow" >landmark</a> building from new perspectives with a surrounding walkway included in the cage.&nbsp;</p>           

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