Trump Tower is blocking off the public from promised public spaces on site

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/3z/3z60c7f4bjx1jmod.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/3z/3z60c7f4bjx1jmod.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/3z/3z60c7f4bjx1jmod.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/3z/3z60c7f4bjx1jmod.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Otherwise known as <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/630483/privately-owned-public-space" rel="nofollow" >POPS or POPOS</a>, pseudo-public space is often offered up by developers in exchange for the city giving them permission to add more floors or density than the current zoning allows for. An incentive pioneered in <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/12384/new-york-city" rel="nofollow" >NYC</a>'s 1961 zoning ordinance revision, today, there are more than 500 spaces in the city legally reserved for public use on privately owned and managed real estate. One of these is the President's gilded <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/530176/trump-tower" rel="nofollow" >Trump Tower</a>.
In the late 1970s, the billionaire real estate mogul made a deal with the city to add restrooms, two upper-level public gardens, and an atrium with a 22-foot long stone bench so he could build 20 more floors onto the-then 38-story building. Shortly after the building's completion, the promised bench, in Trump fashion, was removed leading to a 30-year scandal resulting in multiple fines including one for $10,000 issued by the Department of Buildings. Making all the more insulting, the bench's place went to a kiosk hawking the man's self-pro...

Leave a Reply