Three-story segment of Robin Hood Gardens acquired by V&A Museum ahead of demolition

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/na/na657qvprzvwrhrd.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/na/na657qvprzvwrhrd.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/na/na657qvprzvwrhrd.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/na/na657qvprzvwrhrd.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em><p>A three-storey chunk of an east London council estate that is venerated and despised in almost equal measures has been acquired by the V&amp;A.
The museum announced it had made one of the most unusual property deals in its history: rescuing an enormous chunk of the Robin Hood Gardens estate, complete with walkway and maisonette interiors.



Completed in 1972 and considered an icon of brutalist architecture — representing the good and the bad traits of the movement, depending on the perspective — the Tower Hamlets "Robin Hood Gardens" council estate is being demolished. By salvaging an intact piece of the building designed by Alison and Peter Smithson, the V&A seeks to preserve an significant moment in history.

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