The Triplex Apartments by Luigi Rosselli Architects

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/the-triplex-apartments-by-luigi-rosselli-architects/luigi-rosselli-architects-the-triplex-apartments-004/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://design-milk.com/images/2017/11/luigi-rosselli-architects-the-triplex-apartments-004-810x608.jpg" alt="The Triplex Apartments by Luigi Rosselli Architects" /></a>
                                <a href="http://luigirosselli.com/residential/the-triplex-apartments" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">The Triplex Apartments</a> were designed by <a href="http://luigirosselli.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Luigi Rosselli Architects</a> in Bellevue Hill, Sydney NSW, who worked around building restrictions in the neighborhood to make it happen. The height of the complex was restricted, therefore, the apartments had to step down with the slope of the property.
The complex appears to be a single family home from the street, which makes it work with the surrounding houses so the board was able to approve the plans. Rosselli designed the top, street level apartment with a curved facade, which aims to welcome you at the entrance with open arms. It’s a trick he learned from his mentor, Romaldo Giurgola. The design resulted in terraced apartments with large outdoors spaces that were finished off with thick concrete edges with lines running horizontally for added texture. Most apartment buildings get away with repeating the same design elements on every floor and in every unit,
with terraced apartments, each floor requires its own layout. Along with the design, Romaine Atwill personalized each unit with different finishes so the interiors have their own look and feel. The decking is a blackbutt timber that was stained a light grey, complementing the concrete. The ceiling features a raked concrete finish for added texture. An Alvar Aalto chair adds a modern yet classic statement amongst the contemporary furnishings. The kitchen island countertop makes way for a tapered concrete column and continues out to become a bar area for seating. Photos © Edward Birch and Prue Roscoe
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