The Geffrye Museum has created an interactive tour of iconic London home design

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/v4/v4bqqxdm5h9wy55g.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/v4/v4bqqxdm5h9wy55g.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/v4/v4bqqxdm5h9wy55g.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/v4/v4bqqxdm5h9wy55g.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Hackney's Museum of the Home, Geffrye, has teamed up with Go Compare to offer an <a href="http://www.gocompare.com/home-insurance/geffrye-museum/" rel="nofollow" >interactive tour</a> through over 400 years of English urban homes. The museum, which will close in January 2018 for a two-year refurbishment, is set in an 18th century Grade I listed almshouse and explores home and home life from the 1600s to present. Inside, the museum features detailed displays of&nbsp;<a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/722/london" rel="nofollow" >London</a>, middle-class living rooms and gardens that are made available for the first time through their virtual tour to 'visitors' outside of London.&nbsp;&nbsp;
A living room in 1965. Photo by Chris Ridley.
The interactive allows one to explore the radically changing interior design tastes of Londoners from before The Great Fire of London up until the turn of the millennium. Some of the rooms on display include a a typical eighteenth century parlour from a Covent Garden townhouse, an Edwardian suburban drawing room, and a modernist townhouse room among others. Going from room to room, one can see firsthand how Lond...

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