Spires and Gyres: Contemporary Architecture in Jakarta

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/cz/czg3z42hsf21j5af.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/cz/czg3z42hsf21j5af.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/cz/czg3z42hsf21j5af.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/cz/czg3z42hsf21j5af.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em>Jakarta is perhaps the truest realization of a post-colonial cosmopolis. Many former colonial capitals stage a rivalry between quaint traditional centers and desperation-driven peripheries. But Jakarta can be understood not as a dialogue with its former foreign overlords but rather as a fiercely insistent projection of Indonesian independence.</p></em><br /><br /><p>In his latest article for Places, <a href="https://archinect.com/features/article/81465615/a-review-of-joe-day-s-corrections-and-collections-architectures-for-art-and-crime-2013-routledge" rel="nofollow" >Joe Day</a> examines the contemporary architecture of Jakarta through the framework of the utopian terms of the Five Pancasilas, the founding principles of modern Indonesia.&nbsp;
Day traces the development of Indonesian architecture from founding president Pak Sukarno's “modernism with Indonesian characteristics” to the new architectures heralded by the Arsitek Muda Indonesia (AMI) generation of the 1980s and '90s and their contemporary successors.

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