LA-based photographer George Byrne captures the city’s lesser known urban spaces

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/n9/n9l52d0gs3sqf2n9.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/n9/n9l52d0gs3sqf2n9.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/n9/n9l52d0gs3sqf2n9.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/n9/n9l52d0gs3sqf2n9.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />"Buildings are just giant sculptures after all!" describes&nbsp;<a href="http://georgebyrne.com/" rel="nofollow" >George Byrne</a>, the Los Angeles-based photographer who points his camera towards architectural compositions as subject matter for his work. The Australian born artist has now been a resident of Los Angeles for eight years and it shows.&nbsp;

'Corner Composition Palm Springs' 2017 by George Byrne.
'Blue Awning with Yellow' 2017 by George Byrne.
With an interest in deco inspired prefab structures and an affinity for the ubiquitous 'Dingbat' stucco box apartments of the '50s and '60s, Byrne finds an appreciation in the details of Los Angeles architecture developed over years of living within city limits. His most recent work, in particular, focuses on the lesser-known urban landscapes in and around East Hollywood, where the artist lives. 
'Echo Park' 2017 by George Byrne.
'East Hollywood Carpark' 2016 by George Byrne.
Viewing his photos as portraits of the city, Byrne energy from modernist painters Richard Deibenkorn, Frank Stella, ...

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