How a 1980s flood regulation protected many newer homes in Houston during Hurricane Harvey

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/a2/a2hj3nqhkmjsnf10.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/a2/a2hj3nqhkmjsnf10.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/a2/a2hj3nqhkmjsnf10.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/a2/a2hj3nqhkmjsnf10.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em><p>No other major metropolitan area in the U.S. has grown faster than Houston over the last decade, with a significant portion of new construction occurring in areas that the federal government considers prone to flooding.
But much of that new real estate in those zones did just fine, a Times analysis has found.



The City of Houston, notorious for its relative lack of zoning codes, did in fact take future flooding into account and mandated that new homes were to be built at least 12 inches above flood levels predicted by the federal government. "The 1985 regulation and others that followed," the LA Times writes, "proved widely effective in their biggest test to date — the record-setting rains of Harvey."

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