Acoustic architecture and the geometry of "focalizers"

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sr/sr1y8my14g98tm8q.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sr/sr1y8my14g98tm8q.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sr/sr1y8my14g98tm8q.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sr/sr1y8my14g98tm8q.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Entering into a new space means stepping into a new acoustic arena. Whether subconscious or at the forefront of our attention, the way sound resonates in a built environment is part of a crafted experience influencing how people relate to a space. The presence of a circle or semi circle in architecture produces a specific phenomena which many encounter in passing. When an individual passes through the exact center of a dome their own voice is reflected back to them louder than any other sound in the present environment.&nbsp;
Classified by some as “focalizers”, these instances occur predominantly in cathedrals or capital domes. Where some may simply pass through, others seek out this center point to experience their own private arena of sound. The acoustical reflection is immediate, clear, and amplified above any other surrounding noise. 
Whispering Gallery in Grand Central Terminal.
A related phenomenon is the "whispering which occurs along a curved surface carrying even the slig...

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